There have been two things which have largely shaped the direction of artist Terry Borden’s musical trajectory: his love of AM radio and his brother’s record collection. He was exposed to all kinds of different music during his childhood in the 70s, but it wasn’t until the early 80s in Los Angeles when Borden began to feel a potent kinship for the then-burgeoning post-punk and new wave scenes. He subsequently spent some time living in the United Kingdom where he was witness to the growth of seminal labels such as 4AD, Creation, Factory, and Rough Trade.

Over the next few decades he would gather a remarkable collection of experiences which would mold the way he looks at his own rhythmic impulses and how best to interpret their own capricious natures. From receiving a few kind words from Lou Reed to making a couple of appearances on David Letterman, as well as hanging out with Radiohead and tackling 250-plus tour dates a year as part of slowcore legends Idaho and Peter Yorn’s backing band Dirty Bird, he spent time in the company of others who helped further refine the lens of his own melodic ambitions.

Under the moniker of Blesson Roy, he creates spry jangling wonders of power pop theatricality, mixing the beach-y vibes of the Beach Boys with Big Star’s vibrant melodies – and filtering the whole thing through the heartfelt AM dials of his youth. He’s set to release his new EP, Time is a Crime, on May 8 via Slow Start Records, and it finds him continuing to explore and dissect the sounds of his childhood as well as those which has become part of his DNA in recent years.

This melding of the past and present is nowhere more apparent than is his recent single, “Lost & Found”, a vibrant and ethereal tumble that evokes the acoustic orchestrations of Mojave 3 and the indie-pop buoyancy of The Sundays. It’s a beautifully realized bit of music that reaffirms the notion of pop music having have no set dimensions – it ebbs and flows along with Borden’s gossamer voice, a pale light born from low evening hours. The accompanying lyric video offers scenes of sandy vistas, desert architecture, and the natural beauty which can be found all around us. It’s a fitting atmosphere for “Lost & Found” to deliver its breathtaking treatise on life’s complications and how we all approach the decisions that direct our steps every day.

“’Lost’ and ‘Found’ are two of the primary states of existence metaphorically, and for sure, the poles of creativity,” explains Borden. “You could say ‘Lightness’ and ‘Darkness’ or ‘Stop’ and ‘Go’, or any other cliché metaphor for the duality of life. I choose ‘Lost’ and ‘Found’ because it’s fun to go somewhere you’ve never been before physically or artistically and find things that you’ve never encountered but seem totally familiar. The song ‘Lost & Found’ is about that. It seems like we are just remembering how to go switch on the lights when we come up with a solution to a problem, like surrendering to the frustration of uncontrollable situations.”

He adds: “The ‘Lost & Found’ is also good for picking up jackets and sweaters that you have left behind in the cinema or in the people mover!”